Bibliography

June 21, 2010

Written by Belinda Yung, MIT

    1. Aebischer, Pascale, Edward J. Esche and Nigel Wheale, eds. Remaking Shakespeare: Performance across Media, Genres and Cultures. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.Brown, John Russell. New Sites for Shakespeare: Theatre, the Audience, and Asia. London: Routledge, 1999.
    2. Ashizu, Kaori, “Kurosawa’s Hamlet?” Shakespeare Studies 33 (1995): 71-99.
    3. Auslander, Philip, Liveness: Performance in a Mediatized Culture. London: Routledge, 2008.
    4. Awasthi, Suresh, Performance Tradition In India, New Delhi: National Book Trust, 2001.
    5. Awasthi, Suresh, “The Intercultural Experience and the Kathakali King Lear,” New Theatre Quarterly IX: 34, May 1993: 178.
    6. Bharucha, Rustom, “Foreign Asia/Foreign Shakespeare: Dissenting Notes on New Asian Interculturality, Postcoloniality, and Recolonization.” Theatre Journal 56.1 (2004): 1-28.
    7. Billings, Timothy, “Caterwauling Cataians: The Genealogy of a Gloss.” Shakespeare Quarterly 54.1 (2003): 1-28.
    8. Brandon, James R., “Some Shakespeare(s) in Some Asia(s).” Asian Studies Review 20 (1997): 1-26.Burnett, Mark Thornton. Filming Shakespeare in the Global Marketplace. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007.
    9. Burnett, Mark T., and Ramona Wray, eds. Shakespeare, Film, fin de siècle. New York: Palgrave, 2000.
    10. Burt, Richard, ed. Shakespeares after Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of the Bard in Mass Media and Popular Culture. Westport: Greenwood, 2007.
    11. Burt, Richard, “Shakespeare and Asia in Postdiasporic Cinemas: Spin-offs and Citations of the Plays from Bollywood to Hollywood.” Shakespeare, the Movie II: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video. Ed. Richard Burt and Lynda Boose. New York: Routledge, 2003. 265-303
    12. Burt, Richard and Lynda E. Boose, eds. Shakespeare, the Movie II: Popularizing the Plays on Film, TV, and Video. New York: Routledge, 2003.
    13. Cartelli, Thomas and Katherine Rowe. New Wave Shakespeare on Screen. Cambridge: Polity, 2007.Cartelli, Thomas. Repositioning Shakespeare: National Formations, Postcolonial Appropriations. London: Routledge, 1999.
    14. Chatterjee Sudipto and Jyotsna Singh, “Moor or less? The surveillance of Othello, Calcutta 1848.” in Shakespeare and Appropriation, ed. Christy Desmet and Robert Sawyer, London: Routledge, 1999.
    15. Chaudhuri, Sukanta and Chee Seng Lim, eds. Shakespeare without English: The Reception of Shakespeare in Non-Anglophone Countries. Delhi: Pearson/Longman, 2006.
    16. Das Gupta, Hemendra Nath. The Indian Stage. rpt., New Delhi: Munshiram Manoharlal, 2002.
    17. Desmet, Christy and Robert Sawyer, eds. Shakespeare and Appropriation. London: Routledge, 1999.
    18. Dionne, Craig and Parmita Kapadia, eds. Native Shakespeares: Indigenous Appropriations on a Global Stage. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2008.
    19. Donaldson, Peter, Shakespearean Films / Shakespearean Directors. Boton: Unwin Hyman, 1990.
    20. Donaldson, Peter, “‘All Which It Inherit’: Shakespeare, Globes and Global Media.” Shakespeare Survey: An Annual Survey of Shakespeare Studies and Production. 52 (1999): 183-200.
    21. Esche, Edward J., ed. Shakespeare and His Contemporaries in Performance. Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing, 2002.
    22. Fotheringham, Richard, Christa Jansohn, and R.S. White, eds. Shakespeare’s World / World Shakespeares. Newark: U of Delaware P, 2008.
    23. Fischlin, Daniel and Mark Fortier, eds., Adaptations of Shakespeare: A Critical Anthology. London: Routledge, 2000
    24. Grady, Hugh, Presentist Shakespeares. London: Routledge, 2006

  1. Guneratne, Anthony R., Shakespeare, Film Studies, and the Visual Cultures of Modernity. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.
  2. Henderson, Diana E., ed. A Concise Companion to Shakespeare on Screen. Oxford: Blackwell, 2006.
  3. Hoenselaars, Ton, ed. Shakespeare and the Language of Translation. London: Thomson Learning, 2004
  4. Hoenselaars, Ton, ed. Shakespeare’s History Plays: Performance, Translation, and Adaptation in Britain and Abroad. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004
  5. Hodgdon, Barbara, The Shakespeare Trade: Performances and Appropriations. Philadelphia: U of Philadelphia P, 1999.
  6. Hodgdon, Barbara, and W.B. Worthen, eds. A Companion to Shakespeare and Performance. Oxford, England: Blackwell, 2005.
  7. Holland, Peter, ed. Shakespeare, Memory and Performance. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2006.
  8. Howard, Tony, Women as Hamlet: Performance and Interpretation in Theatre, Film and Fiction. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2007.
  9. Huang, Alexa, Chinese Shakespeares: Two Centuries of Cultural Exchange. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009.
  10. Huang, Alexa  and Charles S. Ross, eds., Shakespeare in Hollywood, Asia, and Cyberspace. West Lafayette: Purdue University Press, 2009.
  11. Huang, Alexa, “Shakespeare, Performance, and Autobiographical Interventions.” Shakespeare Bulletin: A Journal of Performance Criticism and Scholarship 24.2 (2006): 31-47.
  12. Huang, Alexa, “Shakespearean Localities and the Localities of Shakespeare Studies.” Shakespeare Studies 35 (2007): 186-204.
  13. Huang, Alexa, “Site-Specific Hamlets and Reconfigured Localities: Jiang’an, Singapore, Elsinore.” The Shakespearean International Yearbook 7 (2007): 22-48.
  14. Huang, Alexa, “Shakespeare bunt geschminkt. Die chinesische Shakespeare-Werkstatt.” Lebendige Erinnerung — Xiqu. Zeitgenössische Entwicklungen im chinesischen Musiktheater. Ed. Tian Mansha and Johannes Odenthal. Berlin: Verlag Theater der Zeit, 2006. 156-65.
  15. Hutcheon, Linda, A Theory of Adaptation. London: Routledge, 2006
  16. Kennedy, Dennis, Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993.
  17. Kennedy, Dennis, Looking at Shakespeare: A Visual History of Twentieth-Century Performance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001
  18. Kishi, Tetsuo and Graham Bradshaw, eds. Shakespeare in Japan. London: Continuum, 2005.
  19. Kishi, Tetsuo, Roger Pringle, and Stanley Wells, eds. Shakespeare and Cultural Traditions. Newark: U of Delaware P, 1994.
  20. Krontiris, Tina, and Jyotsna Singh, eds. Shakespeare Worldwide and the Idea of an Audience, special issue Journal of Theory and Criticism 15 (2007).
  21. Lai, Ananda and Sukanta Chaudhuri, eds. Shakespeare on the Calcutta Stage: A Checklist, Calcutta: Papyrus, 2001.
  22. Li, Ruru, Shashibiya: Staging Shakespeare in China. Hong Kong: Hong Kong UP, 2003.
  23. Li, Ruru, “Shakespeare on the Chinese Stage in the 1990s.” Shakespeare Quarterly 50.3 (1999): 355-67.
  24. Li, Ruru, “The Bard in the Middle Kingdom.” Asian Theatre Journal 12.1 (1995): 50-84.
  25. Makaryk, Irena R. and Joseph G. Price, eds. Shakespeare in the Worlds of Communism and Socialism Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006.
  26. Loomba, Ania, “Shakespearian Transformations,” in Shakespeare and National Culture, ed. John Joughin, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1997.
  27. Loomba, Ania, Introduction with Martin Orkin, and “‘Local-manufacture made-in-lndia Othello fellows’:
    Issues of race, hybridity and location in post-colonial Shakespeares,” in Postcolonial Shakespeares, ed. Ania Loomba and Martin Orkin, London and New York: Routledge, 1998.
  28. Mangala Frost, Christine, “30 Rupees for Shakespeare: A Consideration of Imperial Theatre in India,” Modern Drama 35 (1992) 93.
  29. Massai, Sonia, ed. World-Wide Shakespeares: Local Appropriations in Film and Performance. London: Routledge, 2006.
  30. Minami, Ryuta, Ian Carruthers, and John Gillies, eds. Performing Shakespeare in Japan. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2001.
  31. Nagarajan, S. and S. Viswanathan, eds. Shakespeare in India, Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1987.
  32. Narasimhaiah. C.D., ed. Shakespeare came to India, Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1964.
  33. Orkin, Martin, Local Shakespeares: Proximations and Power. London: Routlegde, 2005.
  34. Paul, Sunita, ed. A Tribute to Shakespeare, New Delhi: Theatre and Television Associates, 1989.
  35. Richmond, Farley P., Darius L. Swann and Philip Zarrilli, Indian Theatre: Traditions of Performance, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1990; and Delhi: Motilal Banarasi Dass, 1993.
  36. Shakespeare in India, a brochure. National Library, Calcutta, 1964.
  37. Shankar, D.A., ed. Shakespeare in Indian Languages, Shimla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study, 1999.
  38. Shaughnessy, Robert, The Shakespeare Effect: A History of Twentieth-Century Performance. New York: Palgrave, 2002.
  39. Shin, Jungok, Shakespeare Came to Korea. Seoul: Baeksin Publisher, 1998.
  40. Singh, Jyotsna, “Different Shakespeares: The Bard in Colonial / Postcolonial India,” in Shakespeare: Varied Perspectives. ed. Vikram Chopra, 1st. pub. Theatre Journal 41 (1989).
  41. Singh, Jyotsna, “The Postcolonial/Postmodern Shakespeare,” in Shakespeare: World Views eds. Heather Kerr. Robin Eades and Madge Mitten, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1996.
  42. Singh, Jyotsna, Colonial Narratives: Discoveries of India in the Language of Colonialism, London : Routledge, 1996.
  43. Trivedi, Harish, “Shakespeare in India: Colonial Contexts,” in Colonial Transactions: English Literature and India, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1995; 1st. pub. Calcutta: Papyrus, 1993.
  44. Trivedi, Poonam and Dennis Bartholomeusz. eds. India’s Shakespeare: Translation, Interpretation and Performance, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2005.
  45. Trivedi, Poonam, “Interculturalism or Indigenisation: Modes of Exchange, Shakespeare East and West,” in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries in Performance. ed. Edward J. Esche, London: Ashgate, 2000.
  46. Trivedi, Poonam, “Re-locating Shakespeare: Acting and Re-acting to Othello in India,” in Shakespeare
    in China: Perspectives and Performances: A Collection of Theses
    , Shanghai: Shanghai Theatre Academy, 1999.
  47. Trivedi, Poonam, “Shakespeare on the Stages of Asia,” section on India, in the Cambridge Companion
    to Shakespeare on Stage, eds. Stanley Wells and Sarah Stanton, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.
  48. Trivedi, Poonam, “Reading Other Shakespeares,” in Remaking Shakespeare: Performance Across Media, Genres and Cultures, eds. Pascale Aebischer, Edward J. Esche and Nigel Wheale, London: Palgrave, 2003.
  49. Trivedi, Poonam, “Re-dressing Shakespeare: Ethnic Identity and Costume in Indian Productions of Shakespeare,” Ethnicity and Identity : Globlal Performance ed. Ravi Chaturvedi and Brian Singleton, Jaipur: Rawat Publishers, 2005.
  50. Varadpande, M.L., History of Indian Theatre, 2 vols., New Delhi: Abhinav Publications, 1992.
  51. Vatsayayan, Kapila, Traditional Indian Theatre: Multiple Streams. New Delhi: National Book Trust, 1980.
  52. Yajnik, R.K., The Indian Theatre, London: Allen and Unwin, 1933.
  53. Yong, Li Lan, “Ong Keng Sen’s Desdemona, Ugliness, and the Intercultural Performative.” Theatre Journal 56.2 (2004): 251-73.
  54. Zarrilli, Philip B., “For Whom is a King a King? Issues of Intercultural Production, Perception, and Reception in a Kathakali King Lear,” in Critical Theory and Performance, eds. Janelle G. Reinelt and Joseph R. Roach. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan P, 1995.

Key Online Resources

Asian Shakespeares, ed. Alexa Huang.

Designing Shakespeare: An Audio Visual Archive, 1960-2000, ed. Christie Carson.

World Shakespeare Bibliography Online, ed. James L. Harner.

Shakespeare on Film and Television,  Library of Congress.

Shakespeare in Asia, Stanford University.

Sh:in:E — Shakespeare in Europe.

 

Journals

Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation

Multicultural Shakespeare: Translation, Appropriation and Performance, ed. Yoshiko Kawachi and Krystyna Kujawińska Courtney.  ISSN: 2083-8530 (print version). Uniwersytet Łódzki, Poland.  Published by Versita

Shakespeare

Shakespeare Bulletin

Shakespearean International Yearbook

Shakespeare Survey

Shakespeare Yearbook

 

Awasthi, Suresh. “The Intercultural Experience and the Kathakali King Lear,” New Theatre Quarterly IX: 34, May 1993: 178.

Leave a Comment